Media Appearances

The Safer Society Podcast

Dr. Alissa Ackerman-Acklin is a sex crimes policy researcher at California State University, Fullerton. As a survivor of sexual violence herself, Alissa uses her personal experience and her professional expertise to bridge connections between individuals who have experienced sexual victimization and individuals who have perpetrated it. She talks about her new book Healing from Sexual Violence: The Case for Vicarious Restorative Justice. 

In this episode, Dr. Ackerman:

  • Explains the concept of restorative justice (RJ), a framework that brings together people who have caused harm with people who have been harmed.

  • Talks about the use of RJ worldwide to address societal harms (e.g., apartheid in South Africa), its recent introduction in the U.S. as an alternative to incarceration for low-level crimes, and her proposed framework for its use in cases of sexual abuse.

  • Describes vicarious restorative justice (VRJ), a practice that allows individuals who have experienced sexual harm to sit face to face with individuals who have perpetrated it.

2019-11-12T19:14:09+00:00
In this podcast, Alissa talks about the vicarious restorative justice (VRJ) process she developed.

In Age of #MeToo, Can There be Forgiveness, Second Chances?

At times, when famous men, such as the comedian Louis C.K., have made public apologies that are deemed insufficient, it can cause them to retreat from view, said Alissa Ackerman-Acklin, an assistant professor of criminal justice at California State University, Fullerton. But she said that’s the opposite of what we should want.

“If we want a society free of sexual misconduct and we want people to really understand the impact of their actions, then publicly shaming them is not the way to do it. It makes us feel good, but it doesn’t do anything to reduce sexual misconduct,” Ackerman-Acklin said.

 

Check out the full story here.
2019-11-12T19:34:12+00:00
“If we want a society free of sexual misconduct and we want people to really understand the impact of their actions, then publicly shaming them is not the way to do it. It makes us feel good, but it doesn’t do anything to reduce sexual misconduct,” Ackerman-Acklin said.
2019-11-12T19:06:47+00:00
Alissa has conversation with Josh Hoe on the Decarceration Nation Podcast where we talked about restorative justice in the context of sexual crimes.

Alissa on The Registry Report

Join us for an interview with Dr. Alissa Ackerman, as we discuss her perspectives on criminal justice reform, the sex offender registry, and her work as an advocate for restorative justice. 

"The conversation around ending sexual victimization has become polarized. With people on one side calling for war against a culture that allows gender based violence to occur and individuals on the other side suggesting that survivors and feminists have taken it too far, the discourse appears to be black and white. Ending sexual abuse requires a nuanced approach - one where we lean into uncomfortable conversations. I am committed to ending sexual abuse in all forms. In my years as a public rape survivor and a sex crimes policy expert, I have learned one very important lesson."  ~ Dr. Alissa Ackerman

Our hosts for this show are Michael McKay, Shawna Baldwin, Elizabeth Christensen, and Dwayne Daughtry
2019-11-12T17:41:15+00:00
Join us for an interview with Dr. Alissa Ackerman, as we discuss her perspectives on criminal justice reform, the sex offender registry, and her work as an advocate for restorative justice. 

Alissa’s work highlighted on VICE News

The #MeToo reckoning has impacted everything — from Supreme Court nominees and workplace culture to sex and dating. On Consent, VICE on HBO correspondent Isobel Yeung takes a personal look at how we define sexual consent, hold those who violate it accountable, and move forward.
2019-11-12T19:10:20+00:00
The #MeToo reckoning has impacted everything — from Supreme Court nominees and workplace culture to sex and dating. On Consent, VICE on HBO correspondent Isobel Yeung takes a personal look at how we define sexual consent, hold those who violate it accountable, and move forward.

Growing Efforts Are Looking At How — Or If — #MeToo Offenders Can Be Reformed

NPR recently concluded a series of pieces on sex crimes and restorative justice. Here is a brief clip of the piece. Read the entire piece here.

It's cathartic for him and healing for the survivors who were with him in the circle, including Alissa Ackerman.

"I don't even know how to describe it in words," she says, "but it was just this moment of being heard, by someone who'd caused sexual harm. It is a weight that you no longer have to carry."

Ackerman, an assistant professor of criminal justice at California State University, Fullerton, now leads restorative justice circles for others, convinced that it can teach empathy and motivate change like nothing else.

 
2019-11-12T22:11:40+00:00
NPR recently concluded a series of pieces on sex crimes and restorative justice. Here is a brief clip of the piece. Read the entire piece here. It's cathartic for him and healing for the survivors who were with him in the circle, including Alissa Ackerman. "I don't even know how to describe it in words," she says, "but it was just this moment of being heard, by someone who'd caused sexual harm. It is a weight that you no longer have to carry." Ackerman, an assistant professor of criminal justice at California State University, Fullerton, now leads restorative justice circles for others, convinced that it can teach empathy and motivate change like nothing else.  

Restorative Justice A Step Towards Healing

Restorative justice has its critics but US criminologist Professor Alissa Ackerman says it can be a powerful way to promote healing for both victims and perpetrators. “Despite evidence that restorative justice practices can provide accountability for individuals who have engaged in acts of sexual victimization and promote healing for those who have experienced sexual violence, many refute its validity,’’ she said.  

The self-described ‘survivor’ scholar and professor of criminal justice from California State University has been teaching classes on sexual violence for more than 10 years. “On the first day of class I explain to students that they have the unique opportunity to hear the personal perspective of a survivor and the professional perspective of a sex crimes expert.

“While many academics tend to shy away from the personal, I truly believe that personal is the professional and vice versa.” 

Alissa visits Brisbane, Australia for a Visiting Professorship.

Listen to her national radio interview here. 
2019-11-12T22:05:08+00:00
Restorative justice has its critics but US criminologist Professor Alissa Ackerman says it can be a powerful way to promote healing for both victims and perpetrators. “Despite evidence that restorative justice practices can provide accountability for individuals who have engaged in acts of sexual victimization and promote healing for those who have experienced sexual violence, many refute its validity,’’ she said.